Archive for March, 2013

The Myriad Colours of Social Media

Posted by on Mar 26 2013 | Facebook, Internet, Social Media, social media optimization

Colours – They remind you of two things – the joyous festival of holi; and, the uninterrupted, essential variety of life. Take for example social media. There is absolutely no dearth of variety in the purpose and usage of these platforms. You have the red queen Pinterest, Blue bird Twitter, a blue and white journal Facebook, and many more ways of keeping entertained. Social Media indeed is motley of interesting ideas to draw from. Each platform, however, has a USP. The confluence of connectivity with social media is an interesting development that the Internet has witnessed.

The world today enjoys many facets of this platform. There are innumerable social media platforms waiting to be explored. Not just that – there is a lot that you can do with and on each of those platforms. Even though you are doing a number of things on social media, there are a number of activities that you can take up of which you don’t even have an inkling of idea about. Finding a job, learning a language, chatting, dating, keeping in touch – all can be done through a single social media platform. Here are some variants of is worldwide usage:

  • From Black Churches to Everyday businesses, every organization makes use of social media in a manner that suits them. Have you ever heard about a court room trial being tweeted about? That’s what Courier-Post did once.
  • Another important aspect of social media is that it thrives on change. Since technology is the base of every social media activity, a small change in technology can open a number of avenues in the periphery of social media.
  • Varied social media platforms are suitable for laptops and desktops. With the invention of smart phones, using social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest on phone has become feasible.

While the four main slices of the social media pie can be divided into video updates, test updates, photo updates, and content updates, there are many other things that social media has made possible.  Think Farmville for example; apart from the fun and enjoyment that it provides, the game teaches a lot of farming. With social media, be a little creative and a lot creative, to realize all the facets of the platforms.

Image courtesy seelevel.com

1 comment for now

eBrands and Social Media

Posted by on Mar 23 2013 | branding, Facebook, Social Media

From the day Facebook allowed brands to have their exclusive presence on the social media platform, brands have started benefitting more. There was an essential need of awareness and a platform where brands can talk to the consumers. This is now met by the social media platforms and they also allow brands for various modes of engagement.

Facebook:  As mentioned earlier, Facebook has given brands the liberty to have an exclusive branding page. This comes with a variety of options that can be added to the brand page apart from the basic information. Brands can get started with contests and bring in more consumers in their circle. However, for brands, an increase in the number of followers on these platforms, also mean an everyday interaction strategy via posts.

Twitter:  Twitter, on the other hand allows brands to take on the interaction in the shortest possible word. Brands should be open to the idea that people may not always tweet the best about them. In such cases, it also acts as a space for a turnaround strategy, taking customer grievances seriously and welcoming them for solutions.

Pinterest:  The branding via platforms like Pinterest is largely based on the visual. It is more like a space where people can window shop your products. This space is still growing and not all brands have successfully utilized it. A very important factor that would work for Pinterest strategy will be with brands opening up to the idea of showcase. The more the impact of products, the better the reach.

There are other mediums like Youtube but then again, not every brand can afford a budget to support a commercial video, so third party sharing may work. At this point of time, social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest come with minimal or absolutely no cost, and give the brand a wider exposure.  It is time to get started and getting social, soon.

Image courtesy digimouth.com

no comments for now

4 Tips for a Great Newsletter Design

Posted by on Mar 19 2013 | creative agency, Newsletter

Newsletters are highly capable tools to create and manage traffic on your website. A critical component, in addition to planning and strategy declaration, is the design. Information-heavy newsletters are not reader-friendly, and if the aesthetic isn’t right, essential communication will be lost.

The following steps can be taken to achieve a great newsletter design.

  1. Remember Previews: The initial segment should contain the crux of the newsletter, compressed and clear to understand for the clients. In addition to seeing what the subject of the email is, people get to see a portion of your design that draws them in.
  2. Links: Positioning hyperlinks to your social media representation along with links to pages of your site, which would elucidate the content of your newsletter, encourage viewers and sustain traffic. If the aesthetic matches the user’s inclination to searching for detail after being attracted to a portion, then convenience and ease would factor in by a marked extent.
  3. Unison of Design: Having similarities in the design of your website and newsletter enriches brand recall. Clients are able to associate your website and newsletter when they view either one individually, strengthening you brand and creating traffic through efficient clickability.
  4. First Impression: While integrating your newsletter and brand, allow it to showcase elements of design that clients would relate to your brand. A hand-drawn appearance would work well for creative purposes, such as an art gallery using a palette and easel for their newsletter. Maximising potential for conversations is done through entrancing and specific design, which is suitable to your business cause and operations.

Bolstering your design quality, while maintaining content, is the solution to avoiding large budget designs and gaining a successful virtual medium for your clients to keep track of, and come toward your brand. When viewing the page of the newsletter through an email client, the heading of the designs will be seen, which plays a vital role in terms of traffic. Thus, balancing innovative design with these simple tips, along with your website’s standard paves the way for avenues of new customer bases, and business expansion.

Image courtesy www.eyeforweb.com

no comments for now

5 Influences that Facebook has on your Professional Life

Posted by on Mar 16 2013 | digital marketing, Facebook, Social Media

Keep in mind the fundamental maxim that work is where you go to do specifically assigned tasks, using your trusted expertise for remunerative value. Your personal life could impact this stability if mismanaged.

Facebook shares a majority of a person’s persona and reputation is created or portrayed, through online content. Ranging from simplicities such as posting music you enjoy, liking a status that used crude humour, or adding a friend, each action should remind you that you are accountable. Here are some instances of its influence.

  1. Character Testament: You may be a rising talent or a messy wildfire, depicting your social status in disarray could adversely impact your chances at employment. Depicting interests as different to those of the firm you work at, or being insulting, and abusive all carry severe negative consequences. Additionally, a visible social media butterfly will stand a better chance, as it offers a prologue to character as a possible co-worker. Keep your page clean with information you can always speak comfortably about.
  2. Professional Networking Opportunities: Although LinkedIn and related sites are primary sources of professional online contact, Facebook shouldn’t be abused for frivolous causes. The circles of people you are in contact with on a casual basis are the precedent for the opportunities they afford you. A ‘Pay-it-Forward’ format ceases to exist when there’s an understanding to assist whenever possible.
  3. Privacy and Misinterpretation: Ensure your profile invisibility in Google search. While 37% of employers saw profiles, 12% agreed that wanted to reveal candidate ineligibility. This is incorrect viewing of your information. Streamlining extensive friend lists into distinct, specified lists is also highly useful. Displaying an ability to handle your account is an elementary part to indicating your adeptness at managing your work as well.
  4. Communication: Socially, you may speak and communicate differently. Habitual poor grammar and unduly, lethargic communication should not be conveyed to employers. In a concise manner with language that suffices to surpass critique, write and talk conscientiously. Cultivating the activity augments the person’s own communicative abilities as well.
  5. Overcompensation: While your accomplishments may be notable and respected, Facebook should not become a shrine to your greatness, where ‘friends’ gather and witness your inspirational quotes or clever repertoire of comments. Do not downplay what you have done either. Maintain an earnest outlook with a focussed mentality to assuage any doubts that the market may have.

Handling a Facebook account is simple enough if you concentrate on developing yourself. Moreover, the rewards of having personal and professional lives apart are in excess. You may not be able to keep them that way, but allowing them to co-exist is the way forth.

Image courtesy mashable.com

 

2 comments for now

How Twitter Makes You a Better Writer

Posted by on Mar 14 2013 | Blog, Content Writing, Twitter

The fact that Twitter empowers you to build a huge audience base and serves as a boon to your business is no news. But do you realize that tweeting a more too often can make you a better writer? Well, credit the 140 characters limit for the effect:

Get to the Point Faster, Shorter

A tweet forces you to be brief. It requires you to get your message across in the simplest of language. Whilst you may be the guy who searches for long and flowery adjectives while writing, Twitter does not give you room for that. And before you know it, you are conveying a message or an idea without using too many layers. You begin realizing that you don’t have to be descriptive while describing something in the most explainable manner. You can directly get to the point, without a prologue and still garner readership. The Twitterverse has redefined penmanship.

Exercise Your Vocabulary, without being Extravagant

Since 140 characters are all you can write, you need to shrug yourself off the rich words that force readers to scramble for dictionary. On Twitter, you readers won’t do that. They would just rotate the mouse wheel to scroll to the next Tweet and there goes your chance to gain new readers. So while you start getting accustomed to writing simple, adequately descriptive and yet a mix of words in your tweet, it shows on your blog/article site. You get better at using verbs as well.

What to Leave Out

When you are writing a blog piece, you are eyeing, let’s say, 400 words. There is a lot of redundant information that is included with or without intentions. Inevitably, while drafting long write-ups, you sometimes lose the sight of what your readers might be interested in reading. On Twitter, you have to write the action-oriented words that have the best possible chance of drawing response from the readers. Just get the message across. Writing ‘about’ that message can be done on some other platform, on some other day.

Linear Writing

Blogs and articles give you the freedom of being all over the place. You start writing on a topic, meander off it and then come back. Whilst this might interest a segment of readers would like your article to be not one dimensional,  there are those with a lesser attention span who would only jump the paragraphs. Blogs make you ponder over words and sentences – at times disproportionately, but a Tweet lets to eliminate the redundant thought process and impede your though right then and there, without spending dime of an extra second.

You might argue that Twitter is an oddball platform for improving your writing style,  but as an under-literary way of writing, Tweets can help you curb the on-line blabbering and write with more focus.
Image courtesy 7boats.com

2 comments for now

Recipe for Bloggers: Have You Tasted It Yet?

Posted by on Mar 14 2013 | Blog, Blogging, Uncategorized

It is a believe-it-or-not moment for this blog to have taken shape and an equally unusual space for it to appear. But we like surprises, don’t we? When it comes to blogging, there is a very competitive set of writers who are beating the other genres. They are making good money as well. It is time that before one hits the art of blogging; one should have a look at the happening cookery blogs that have a thing or two to say.

Flavor: One of the crucial elements of cookery blog is the content. Unless an author chooses to stick to a style of cooking or a particular region e.g. theitaliandishblog.com, the world is the platter. The point to be taken home is that keeping the options open gives an advantage in competition.

Catalogue: The cookery blogs offer variety over the range of cooking. There are recipes available from around the world with details that gives step wise guidance towards cooking. Thus, cataloguing becomes an important aspect. It is a crucial lesson for bloggers as a catalogued blog help readers to browse through content.

Richness: The richness part lies in the picturesque presentation. These cookery blogs beat every other in style, photography and appeal. The dishes are presented in rich, colorful setting making the blogs an absolute delight in read like pinchmysalt.com . Evidently, making a strong connection with an online reader requires a good mix of writing and visual.

Share: It may look like that this is meant only for a food fanatic but not necessarily. Here’s an important point to note. The way the participants and readers share their favorite recipes on these blogs is an inspiration. It means for the blogger half the battle is won. For a blogger to get the readers talking, it is important to engage into one or begin a subject that sparks off a conversation.

We suggest trying the above ingredients to make a blog an interesting one. It takes a little motivation, a bit of skill, a pinch of dedication and some artistry for the touch up for a perfect blog recipe. Blog Appétit.

Image courtesy stephenweb.com

 

no comments for now

Social Media: Boon or Bane?

Posted by on Mar 06 2013 | digital marketing, Social Media, Uncategorized

Sauntering past the yawn inducing jargon of the technological era having encompassed our very lives, we reach the crux of social media and its being imperative to usage in every sphere.

Social media is often littered with requests for Emergency Blood Donors, Homes for Adopted Pets, Work Opportunities, and numerous related criteria that cement the fact that it does indeed, provide considerable possibility for every need.

This writer can testify in smaller, rarer circumstances, where a hugely popular musician offered an old acoustic guitar, free of cost, to anyone who had the will to learn how to play, as the musician himself delivered the instrument, with a pleasant smile and an endearingly self-condescending demeanour.

Those who deign networking as a time-consuming, frivolous activity couldn’t be more misinformed. With the scope of the internet, it only grows more relevant and useful. We are inclined to believe that with such means, we can meet most ends.

While around 36% of social media content posted by us is brand-related, 75% of businesses felt duly obliged to acknowledge this. Simultaneously, we must be aware of how we have the power to utilize the same for our own development.

LinkedIn, currently the world’s largest professional network with 160,000,000 registered users, is the pinnacle of work opportunity webs. Listing proud past achievements, bearing arduously earned endorsements, and hosting histories of work-related accomplishments, it supports the professional aspirations while integrating an infinite network of talent, ability, skill, and experience.

Skillzot uses a Pay-it-Forward format which brings together participants for the exchange of taught skills, while tutoring others in core competencies. This basic mentality compels our attention toward our self worth and target setting.

Even in social media networks with a more casual recall, there are connections for causes of all kinds. Multiple startups compete with established firms for the pick of the lot, giving the potential employee the boon of choice. Particular professions and selective skill sets that often have an edge over the rest include Voice Over Artists, Actors or Models, Graphic Designers, Illustrators, Coders. To be fair, the playing field has never been as equal and the onus is on us to exploit this trove of opportunity.

How do we do this?

Building a solid profile with crisp depictions of our decorated works, simplistic interpretations of completed folios, along with substantiated recommendations by respected names, is the need of the hour. Keeping an ear to the ground, an eye out for the smoke signals, whichever form of communication you can visualize, we undertake to satiate these requirements with our own.

Imbibing this indicative ideology of strengthened foundations and reinforced structures for applications, our outreach scales peaks of unnecessary pedantic, while maintaining decorum and procedure. Understanding and realizing our own ability is essential to achieve this, and with the time we frequently and poorly invest, we can do much more.

Image courtesy twentyproject.com

 

 

 

no comments for now